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Eva Shockey, Kristy Titus and Taylor Drury on Bullying and Hunting

The amount of anti-hunter bullying that now takes place on social media has risen dramatically in recent years. Their hateful and often violent comments are meant to intimidate hunters. If this type of bullying were directed at another group, it would be all over the media and people would be outraged.  As hunters we need to stand up for what we believe in, be educated on the facts and be united in our cause.

Girls with Guns Women's Hunting Gear and Apparel

2 Girls Hunting is sponsored by Girls with Guns Hunting Gear and Apparel.

This past week, we were fortunate enough to visit with 3 predominant women within the hunting community and get their inputs on how to deal with anti-hunters and the increase in cyber-bullying.

Meet the contributors

Eva Shockey is the co-host for her father Jim Shockey’s television show on Outdoor Channel called Jim Shockey’s Hunting Adventures. With a combined passion for conservation and adventure, Eva is now a full-fledged Outdoor Channel and Wild TV personality and is quickly making a name for herself within the industry as a proud, female outdoorswoman.

Kristy Titus is an Oregon native and lifelong hunter and angler. Raised in the backcountry and part of the RMEF Team ELK,  also on Outdoor Channel, she has spent a large amount of time hunting and trekking through the woods and jungles and appreciates serving as an ambassador for women hunters while experiencing the thrill of fair chase hunting. She is passionate in the support of wildlife and habitat conservation and outdoor education. Her ultimate mission is to inspire others, giving them the confidence to tackle the most demanding outdoor activities.

Taylor Drury, seen on Outdoor Channel’s Drury’s THIRTEEN grew up around hunting and learned about the outdoors from her dad, Mark, and Uncle Terry. Her dad has been taking her out since she was a little girl and now that she is older, Taylor has gained a respect for the sport. For her, there is nothing more fun than spending time with family while trying to harvest an animal.

eva-shockey-moose-Bullying

Eva Shockey

2girls hunting: Ladies, have you been bullied via social media due to your hunting interest?

Eva: Yes, I have been bullied because of my involvement in hunting; most of this bullying comes from people who don’t understand my way of life and what I do, along with other hunters, for wildlife conservation.

Taylor: It is human nature for people to lash out at what they don’t understand. The bullying has increased lately due to people spending more time on social media.

kristy-titus-deer-Bullying

Kristy Titus

2girls hunting: Do you feel that female hunters receive more threats versus our male counterparts?

Kristy: Yes, I believe that people feel women don’t stand up for themselves and hunting is a predominant male activity. Again, know your facts: female hunters are the fastest growing population of hunting.

taylor-Drury-deer2

Taylor Drury

2girls hunting: Kristy, do you have any suggestions on how to respond in a way that promotes the lifestyle in a positive light? 

Kristy: I make sure I give facts; like did you know that through state license and fees, hunters pay $796 million a year for conservation programs. I often refer to my web page, along with the website hosted by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, for facts and research.

taylor-Drury-deer

Taylor Drury makes her deer the primary focus of the photo.

2girls hunting: How about wild game or trophy photos? Taylor, do you have any suggestions on how to pose with your harvest to be less offensive?

Taylor: How I was raised was to pose with just me sitting behind the animal, and to display this animal as the primary focus. I don’t like to put my foot on or show any disrespect toward my harvest.

2girls hunting: Do you think there is such a thing as “trophy hunting?”

Eva: Most people think that trophy hunting is the size of the antlers. When I hunt, I do “selective hunting,” such as a more mature deer or moose. For all the time and effort that I put into every single hunt, for me … they are all trophies.

eva-shockey-outdoor-chan

Eva Shockey on the Outdoor Channel.

2girls hunting: Eva, any suggestions on how to avoid the critics? (Even though they will always be there.) 

Eva: Overall, hunters are responsible for hunters. It doesn’t matter the size of platform or followers, we all make the same contributions. We all need to show respect for the animal and the situations that are presented. I believe with every part of me that what I’m doing is right, so there’s nothing that I’m apologizing for.

2girls hunting: Here’s what we don’t understand … Why do anti-hunters search out social media sites and pictures that they disapprove of? Do you think they are just looking for attention and arguments? When it comes to hunters and being bullied, social media and the media itself seems to just turn a blind eye. So, let’s stand up for your rights to hunt. Be proud of legal, ethical hunting and defend our actions as hunters.

SOCIAL MEDIA:

Eva Shockey 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/evashockeyfanpage

Twitter: https://twitter.com/EvaShockey

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/evashockey/

Website: http://www.evashockey.com/

Kristy Titus 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KristyTitus

Twitter: https://twitter.com/kristytitus

Instagram: https://instagram.com/kristytitus/

Website: http://www.kristytitus.com

Taylor Drury 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/taylordrurydod

Instagram: https://instagram.com/taylordrurydod/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OfficialDruryOutdoors

Website: https://www.druryoutdoors.com/

Have you had problems with bullying on your social media?

The Conversation

2 Comments
  • Joe Black says: September 23, 2016 at 2:59 pm

    Please quit referring to animals taken on a hunt as a “Harvest” it sounds condescending and most hunters do not use it. I hunt my animal, I kill it, and then it feeds my family so it does not go to waste. “Harvest” sounds like we are trying to suck up to the non-hunters and make nice about our sport.

  • Andrea Mahorney says: September 22, 2016 at 8:02 pm

    I have been working in the hunting industry for 14 years as a professional hunting guide and recently a hunting coach at a preserve, The Joy of Hunting, focused on teaching the outdoors Women to hunt. To understand their part in being not only sportswomen but stewards of the land that they are harvesting from. This is my love and my passion.Kristy is spot on with the statistics, The sad and powerful fact is that Money makes the economical world go around and funds through he sales of licenses and tags aid a lot in research and game management projects. I am a huge supporter of wildlife management and especially land stewardship and management. I like what these ladies had to say about this subject and would like to add that hunting for many is a way of life encompassing their diet and exercise regimen. I personally don’t eat beef. I eat venison. The meat I eat is only what I harvest be it fish, upland, waterfowl, or big game that animal it is not wasted. I tell those that want to bully or disapprove of how I live that I am responsible for my own food and I know where it came from, I know it isn’t from a feed lot or grown under a light in a plant. this is my way of life I own it, I love it. How many of them eat at a fast food joint, where did their burger come from? I know where mine is from. North Slopes of Idaho. I like that sort of knowledge I have no guilt about someone killing on my behalf. Enjoyed the article Thank you Ladies.