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Modern Farmhouse Style Wooden Beaded Pumpkin

This craft didn’t go as predicted. I admired a farmhouse style wooden beaded pumpkin craft from the website “DIY with My Guy,” and thought it would be fun to do. We all know that this “modern farmhouse” style is hot, hot, hot. Or, you might consider it more of a Scandinavian IKEA pumpkin. Or, I want to say, it was a huge pain in the you-know-what wooden beaded pumpkin.

Materials for Modern Farmhouse Style Wooden Beaded Pumpkin

Beads, jute wrapped wire and some greenery.
Beads, jute wrapped wire and some greenery.
  • Natural wooden beads (or you could use white ones, but they cost a lot more). Price: $7.80
  • Jute covered wire. Price: $11.45
  • Lamb’s ear or other type of greenery because, frankly, you need a sprig. Maybe check out the floor of Hobby Lobby and see if there are a couple of leftover leaves lying around. I’m serious.
  • Scissors
  • Wirecutters
  • Former fence mending skills would come in handy, too,

Creating (or Wrangling) Your Own Modern Farmhouse Style Wooden Beaded Pumpkin

Cut 5 pieces jute-wrapped wire in 22 inches each. The jute-wrapped vine wire that Amazon sent me didn’t fit through the holes in the wooden beads. Why is that? Amazon has a disclaimer about the width being between 1/8th and 3/16th inches thick, and I think the stuff they sent me bordered on being toward the fat side. It just frayed instead of feeding naturally through those beads. So, I peeled it off the wires and used the bare wires — which you also could use if you were so inclined. Maybe skip buying more expensive jute-wrapped wire.

ruler greenery wrapped wire
I like this old fashioned yard stick for measuring 22-inch strands.

You might want to go to a craft store and try poking a jute covered wire through a wooden bead before you buy the items. (Of course, I found this little problem out after I had already attached the strands together.)

After You Get the Wire Thing Figured Out

Then, take 2 of the wires and make an X. Just wrap them around each other a bit.

wrapping wire for craft
This will be the bottom of the pumpkin.

Take another 2 pieces and make another X.

Combine your 2 Xs in the middle.

attaching wires beaded pumpkin craft
The structure is there and now it’s time to start putting beads on the wires!

Then, feed 11 beads through each strand. You’ll have 8 strands total and you’ll use 88 beads, and believe me, if you order the package from Amazon, you’ll have lots of leftover beads. In fact, maybe you’d like to make this thing for Christmas out of your leftover beads and wire. I snapped this pic at Hobby Lobby, and I’m sure they won’t mind.

Hobby Lobby wooden bead things
Going all out with the wooden beads for Christmas at Hobby Lobby!

Twist the ends of every 2 strands together, then bring them together at the top. This is where I went to retrieve a pair of needle nose pliers from the hub’s workshop. Now, I felt like I was fencing. If you’ve ever stretched fence wire and then, wrapped it, you’ll know what I mean. I felt relieved to have the fat jute wire at this point, because the directions call for hiding the top of the ugly fence wrap with the last piece of jute wire. If I hadn’t had the jute, the pumpkin would look more like an industrial modern farmhouse junky punkin.

construction of modern farmhouse wooden beaded pumpkin
I had to get the wire cutters/needlenose pliers to finish this job!

The final touch calls for cutting 2 sprigs off the lamb’s ear and sticking them artistically into the top.

wire cutters beaded pumpkin
Almost finished.

And voila, here is an industrial pain-in-the-you-know-what modern farmhouse beaded pumpkin that might look quite cute on a Thanksgiving table.

finished product modern farmhouse wooden beaded pumpkin
Was it worth it? I find that I like it the more I see it!
  • About Barbara Baird

    Publisher/Editor Barbara Baird is a freelance writer in hunting, shooting and outdoor markets. She is a contributing editor at "SHOT Business," and her bylines are found at several top hunting and shooting publications. She also is a travel writer, and you can follow her at https://www.ozarkian.com.

     

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